New work from: 907 Crew

droid r2 punk ufo gen2 oze108 atoms

punk smells

ufo smells

droid sadue yusef fishglue

droid smells

droid ufo

droid

cash4 et

cash4

Triple Play: Lister

Australian artist Anthony Lister’s been very busy in the weeks leading up to his solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, opening tomorrow night. It’s been a while since we last featured him here, but I’m glad to report he’s showing his former hometown some love by completing a number of murals in Brooklyn and Manhattan. Here are three of the five seven he’s done so far:

lister

lister

lister

[Lister – all photos (c) Luna Park]

Lister is also the subject of the forthcoming Anthony Lister – Adventure Painter release from Gingko Press, authored by Roger Gastman and Tristan Manco.

Anthony Lister: Power Tripping
Jonathan LeVine Gallery
529 West 20th Street
9th Floor
New York, New York 10010

June 28—July 26, 2014
Opening: Saturday, June 28, 6—8pm

Serpent on the Banks of the Esopus

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Over the course of the last year, New York based artists Andrew H. Shirley and Amanda Wong built a tree-house in the boughs of a sugar maple tree on the banks of Ulster County’s Esopus Creek near Kingston, NY.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
The Esopus Creek (photo by Luna Park)

The tree-house was built entirely out of reclaimed materials sourced from nearby abandoned structures. The tree-house, reached by rickety ladder, is a sculptural space which will host three exhibitions this summer.

Amanda Wong explained the intent of the project: “Constructing the tree-house was a sculptural and curatorial project seeking to challenge the conventional places and aesthetics that form contemporary art practices by recontexualizing where and how art exists. The tree-house situates the exhibition of art within remote nature as a gesture towards geographically decentralizing and ideologically reconfiguring cultural centers such as museums and galleries.”

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

On Saturday, June 21st, the tree-house was inaugurated with a light installation by Andrew Poneros. Poneros’ illuminated, etched glass bottles were mounted individually on trees surrounding the tree-house.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

And within the tree-house, Poneros mounted a stunning chandelier, whose motifs of serpents, birds, fish and plants couldn’t have been better suited to the bucolic location. As the sun set, the tree-house slowly took on a warm and enchanting glow.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

At the base of the tree-house overlooking the creek, a small black & white TV played one of Poneros’ animations on loop. Be sure to take two minutes and watch Prey for the Eaten.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)
Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Triple Play: Pacman

pacman rooftop

curt x pacman x low5

ufo907 pacman

Bonus *before*:

gen2 x ufo x pacman x muk123

[Pacman, Curt/Pacman/Low5, UFO907/Pacman, Gen2/UFO907/Pacman/Muk123 – all photos (c) Luna Park]

Triple Play: Sweet Toof

After having visited earlier this year, it seems like London-based artist Sweet Toof is back to take another bite out of New York.

yawn sweettoof keely

sweettoof

sweettoof smells cash4

[Yawn/Sweet Toof/Keely, Sweet Toof, Sweet Toof Smells – all photos (c) Luna Park]

Lots more Sweet Toof on the Street Spot!

Triple Play: Shok1

London-based aerosol artist Shok1 recently treated New York to three variations on his X-rainbow series.

shok1

shok1

shok1

[Shok1 for LISA Project, Bushwick Collective, and Welling Court – all photos (c) Luna Park]

Triple Play: Chris Stain & Billy Mode

Artists Chris Stain and Billy Mode extended their long-standing collaboration to include 13 youths from creative-arts youth development organization Cre8tive YouTH*ink in their process. The result? Sign Language, a stunning mural on the side of 267 Pacific Street (at Smith Street), based on a photograph by legendary street photographer Martha Cooper.

chris stain x billy mode x cre8tive youth*ink x martha cooper

billy mode x chris stain

chris stain x billy mode

Billy Mode has just dropped Omni, a series of small edition, hand-sprayed, hand-cut, multi-layer, stencil prints available via Freshly Baked.

[Chris Stain & Billy Mode for Cre8tive YouTH*ink, Bushwick Collective & Welling Court – all photos (c) Luna Park]

Brought To You By The Letter E

Eine (photo by Luna Park)
Eine (photo by Luna Park)

Artists Eine and ElSol25 show off their letterforms on scaffolding and gates in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Eine (photo by Luna Park)
Eine (photo by Luna Park)
Eine (photo by Luna Park)
Eine (photo by Luna Park)
ElSol25 (photo by Luna Park)
ElSol25 (photo by Luna Park)
ElSol25 (photo by Luna Park)
ElSol25 (photo by Luna Park)
ElSol25 (photo by Luna Park)
ElSol25 (photo by Luna Park)

New Street Work by Elbow-Toe

Elbow-Toe (photo by Luna Park)
Elbow-Toe (photo by Luna Park)

After a long stint in the studio preparing work for his well-deserved and well-received solo show in Chelsea last fall, it’s nice to see Elbow-Toe return to the streets, where he’s recently left us several new wheatpastes.

Elbow-Toe (photo by Luna Park)
Elbow-Toe (photo by Luna Park)

Wolftits Memorial

Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)

A massive, 700-pound Wolftits sculpture was installed on a previously empty pedestal outside the former ASPCA Rogers Memorial Animal Hospital near the Gowanus in Brooklyn. Behold it in all its wolfking multi-titty glory!

Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park) new
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)
Wolftits (photo by Luna Park)