Wild World of Wolfbat

Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)

It’s great to see some of Dennis McNett‘s sculptures make it out onto the streets of Brooklyn! This bad boy, covered in the graphic prints Wolfbat Studio has become known for, lurks above a bus stop on Flushing Avenue.

I like to think the chain is for our safety.

Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)
Denis McNett (photo by Luna Park)

Welling Court Needs Your Help

Chris Stain x Billy Mode (photo by Luna Park)
Welling Court 2013: Chris Stain x Billy Mode (photo by Luna Park)

Since 2009, Ad Hoc Art has organized and executed four large-scale mural projects at Queen’s Welling Court. More than 80 local and international artists have contributed hundreds of murals, sculptures and installations to the neighborhood. This endeavor requires enormous time, effort and a small army of volunteers to pull off every year… and lots and lots and lots and lots of paint. If you enjoy any of this fine work – on display for all to see, 24/7, 365 days a year and free of corporate sponsorship – please consider donating to the Welling Court Mural Project on Indiegogo.

AM x Olek (photo by Luna Park)
Welling Court 2013: AM x Olek (photo by Luna Park)
King Bee (photo by Luna Park)
Welling Court 2013: King Bee (photo by Luna Park)
Fresh (photo by Luna Park)
Welling Court 2013: Fresh (photo by Luna Park)

The roster of participating artists includes:
Abe Lincoln, Jr., AM, Alison Buxton, Beau Stanton, Billy Mode, Brian Life, Caleb Neelon, Carlos Mare, Cekis, Cern, Christopher Cardinale, Chris Mendoza, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Clown Soldier, Col Wallnuts, Cycle, Dan Witz, Dennis McNett, Don Leicht, El Kamino, Ellis Gallagher, Free5, Fumero, Gaia, Garrison Buxton, gilf!, Greg Lamarche, Hellbent, Ian Kualiโ€™i, Icy & Sot, Joe Iurato, John Breiner, JC, John Fekner, Jonathan Villoch, Katie Yamasaki, Kimyon Huggins, Lady Pink, lmnop, LogikOne, M-City, Magdalena Marcerano, Matt Siren, Mensen, Mike Fitzsimmons, Mr. Kiji, Never, NDโ€™A, Olek, Pablo Power, Phetus, Prolifique, Queen Andrea, R. Nicholas Kuszyk, Rene Gagnon, Royal Kingbee, Royce Bannon, Rubin, Russell King, Ryan Seslow, SeeOne, Sheryo, Sinned, Skewville, Sonni, SpazeCraft, Subtexture, Steven Cogle, Thundercut, TooFly, Veng RWK, Vera Times, Vexta, Wane COD, The Yok, Zam & more

How & Nosm at Houston & Bowery

How & Nosm detail (photo by Luna Park)

After Os Gemeos in 2009, How & Nosm are the second set of twins to paint the Houston/Bowery wall. This is but the latest mural for the increasingly sought-after duo, having just completed back-to-back mural installations in Stavanger (Norway) and Prague (Czech Republic). The wall references Superstorm Sandy and is dedicated to the memory of developer and street art supporter extraordinaire, Tony Goldman, who recently passed.

How & Nosm (photo by Luna Park)
How & Nosm (photo by Luna Park)
How & Nosm (photo by Luna Park)
How & Nosm (photo by Luna Park)
How & Nosm (photo by Luna Park)

A previous iteration of the wall was painted by Lady Aiko earlier this year. Click here for a round-up of the last 5 years on the wall.

Phlegm in New York

Phlegm dances with Know Hope (photo by Luna Park)

After first seeing his work in person in Bristol a couple years ago, I’m very pleased that Sheffield-based artist Phlegm has finally come through New York. He made a playful addition to a figure Know Hope painted in March on an East Village wall organized by the MaNY Project (above). And he did up a huge wall next to a playground in Chelsea that’s sure to please kids as well as adults (below).

Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)
Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)
Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)
Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)
Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)
Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)
Phlegm (photo by Luna Park)

3xHotTea

Hot Tea (photo by Luna Park)

Minneapolis artist/designer Hot Tea recently came through New York, leaving behind a string of yarn art pieces that cleverly make use of the structure of the standard chain-link fence to create seemingly three-dimensional letters.

The artist explained the origin and significance of Hot Tea on Vimeo:

“The two words hot and tea or more specifically the phrase “HOT TEA” was chosen to highlight the relationship between the two words. We so often over look the meaning behind what we say and how special some of these words and phrases really are.

These two words compliment each other both physically and grammatically. Without one or the other you wouldn’t have a phrase that evokes a sense of comfort, warmth and relaxation. In a physical sense without hot water all you have is tea, and without tea all you have is water, but when both put together you have “HOT TEA”. Hot tea is greater than the sum of its parts.

This idea was the basis for the HOT TEA project. There will always be a relationship between things and that interconnection we have with everything around us is the backbone for how HOT TEA navigates. The project is a comment on all relationships good and bad and the things that lie between them. Like the phrase itself Hot and Tea are two totally different words brought together to represent something new, which reflect on the media and surfaces that the project makes use of.”

Hot Tea (photo by Luna Park)
Hot Tea (photo by Luna Park)

More Cake, Please

Cake (photo by Luna Park)

The lovely and talented Cake recently installed three large portraits in the East Village. After hooking Know Hope up with a wall around the block, this is the second mural this year organized by the MaNY Project‘s seemingly tireless Keith Schweitzer for Fourth Arts Block‘s outdoor visual art program.

Cake (photo by Luna Park)

Cake (photo by Luna Park)

More Cake here, here, and here.

Hurray for Rae

Rae (photo by Luna Park)

Rae’s three-dimensional, found-object, sculptural installations are really starting to grow on me. In an era of cookie-cutter stencils and yet-another-precious-silkscreen wheatpastes, it takes some oddball, one-of-a-kind street art to capture my attention. Keep ’em coming, Rae.

Rae (photo by Luna Park)

Rae (photo by Luna Park)

Rae (photo by Luna Park)

Rae (photo by Luna Park)

You can read an interview with Rae on the new Street Art NYC blog.