On a Roll with Rambo, Sabio, Cash4 and Smells

In the graffiti arsenal, the paint roller is a workhorse. It provides even coverage, laying a foundation for a piece or wiping the slate clean. Add an extender pole to your roller and all manner of otherwise hard-to-reach spots become a possibility. I’m an unabashed fan of blockbuster roller letters with drop shadows, the bigger and more visible, the better. And with a little practice, some unique styles can be worked out of a roller. Lately I’ve been noticing a lot of roller action on vacant billboards along the BQE as well as rooftops along the J/M/Z lines.

Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)
Rollers (photo by Luna Park)

Seedr

Portraits by Seedr.

Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)
Seedr (photo by Luna Park)

Freight Monikers

Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)

My forays into benching have admittedly been few and far between – more for lack of time than opportunity – but I’ve fast become a fan of the freight moniker. Small and relatively easy to miss in comparison to the larger pieces that dominate many boxcars, monikers are part of a unique, symbol-laden language of and by those who ride the rails.

Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)
Freight moniker (photo by Luna Park)

If you’ve got $20 to spare, I can highly recommend you get your hands on a copy of Bill Daniel’s excellent documentary on freight monikers, Who is Bozo Texino?.

Domino Sugar

Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)
Domino Sugar (photo by Luna Park)

Wonder what came first…

Gaia’s chicken-headed man or the Eggyolk?

Gaia (photo by Luna Park)
Gaia (photo by Luna Park)
Miss17 x Eggyolk x Gaia (photo by Luna Park)
Miss17 x Eggyolk x Gaia (photo by Luna Park)

Free NYC screening of Wholetrain

WholetrainFlyerEngl-737390
Since the heyday of painted trains, there have been a number of excellent documentary films that highlighted the burgeoning graffiti movement. The legendary Style Wars and Wild Style come to mind, as well as the more recent Infamy and Bomb It. To date Hollywood has shied away from producing fictionalized accounts of graffiti culture, although that probably isn’t a bad thing, given that graffiti vandalism is often exaggerated and sensationalized. Fortunately for us, first time director Florian Gaag, an active member of Munich’s graffiti scene for many years, has delivered an impressive cinematic debut that accurately represents the writer lifestyle. Filmed on location in Munich and Warsaw, Wholetrain includes striking footage of rolling stock featuring the work of writers Won, Cemnoz, Pure, Ciel and Neon. And if that weren’t enough, Gaag collaborated with Hip Hop great KRS One on the film’s soundtrack.

Next Tuesday, New York will be treated to a free screening of Wholetrain, followed by a discussion between director Florian Gaag and writer Pure. No stranger to painted trains, Pure started writing in the late 70s and has since gotten down with infamous writers such as Reas, Ven, Jonone as well as fellow TFP member Sento.

Wholetrain
Film Screening + Conversation
Tuesday, February 16th, 2010, 7:00pm
Goethe-Institut Wyoming Building
5 East 3rd Street (at Bowery)
New York, NY 10003
Tel.: +1 (212) 439-8700
Closest Subway: 6 at Bleecker Street
Admission is free, no reservations required.

But don’t take my word for it, here’s what others had to say about the film:

Ket: “I loved the movie. I thought that Wholetrain represented the scene the best – ever. It really captured what writers go through and their struggles; they were humanized, they weren’t caricatures. I appreciate that. I remember that it made me feel that I was there with those guys, living with those guys. It took me back to a time when I was living the way those kids were living. I thought it was very authentic in that sense.”

Henry Chalfant: Wholetrain shows the human dimensions of Graffiti-Writing. The social conflicts of the protagonists are fascinating and allow you to take a look at the writers’ real lives. Real characters, real problems. Wholetrain is a very good film that not only reflects writing culture but also leaves room to authentically portray the writers’ social reality.”

See you Tuesday.

Let’s Hope They Avoid (Cardiac) Arrest

Hert and Atak have been catching my eye lately.

Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)
Hert/Atak (photo by Luna Park)

Nasty Neck Face

“Neck Face (b. 1984, Stockton, California) is an anonymous graffiti artist. He is known for his frightening drawing style and humorous writings.” [Wikipedia]

Below is a selection of some of my favorite Neck Face drawings and writings – seems he’s been in town recently, as the top one was new to me.

reach out and touch someone

neckface 06

neck face

satan satan satan

bill murray made me do it!

neckface van(s)

who's that in that nasty car? nasty boys!

2009 Favorites

The below are my 30 favorites of the year – favorite pieces, moments or shots. Scroll all the way down to view this as a slideshow.


mta
MTA, Los Angeles, CA

psychic faust
Faust, New York, NY

hoodrich!
Reader, Brooklyn, NY

armer smells
Armer X Smeller, Brooklyn, NY

msk blockbuster
907 X MSK, Brooklyn, NY

reading the future
Elbow-Toe X Reader, Brooklyn, NY

roa's secret garden
Roa, New York, NY

vhils
Vhils, Grottaglie, Italy

el mac & retna buddha
El Mac X Retna, Los Angeles, CA

os gemeos mural detail
Os Gemeos, New York, NY

brooklyn broken crow w/over under
Broken Crow, Brooklyn, NY

heart of darkness
Muk123, Brooklyn, NY

dr.sex * hour
Dr.Sex X Hour, Los Angeles, CA

banksy
Banksy, Los Angeles, CA

katsu read
Katsu X Reader, Brooklyn, NY

kills me everytime
Rush X Mutz, Brooklyn, NY

conor harrington from the high line
Conor Harrington, New York, NY

rooftop bear
Gaia, Brooklyn, NY

love from chris stain & armsrock
Chris Stain X Armsrock, Brooklyn, NY

wicked
Burning Candy, London, England

just chill
J-Bird, Brooklyn, NY

caps
Caps, Zurich, Switzerland

mister lister
Lister, Brooklyn, NY

combo by david ellis + blu
David Ellis X Blu, Grottaglie, Italy

specter can man
Specter, Brooklyn, NY

blanco
Blanco, Brooklyn, NY

odd couple
Veng X Cake, Brooklyn, NY

for you i got daycare money and carfare honey
Espo, Philadelphia, PA

my kinda skyline
Skyline, Brooklyn, NY

message in a bottle
Blu X Ericailcane, Ancona, Italy


Big thanks to Stefan, Jeremy, Till and Peter for all the support!

Horfe in New York

Summer 2008 I spent a week in Paris – discovering Horfe was definitely one of the highlights of my trip. If you’re not familiar with his weird and wonderful work, be sure to check out his Flickr group.

horfé

He must have come through New York at some point, as I’ve recently come across a couple of pieces he did with Kuma, another favorite writer of mine.

horfe! kuma

kuma, horfé, et al

horfe!