The Last Days of Ad Hoc

Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)

On Wednesday night, Ad Hoc Art Gallery threw one last party before closing its doors for good. It was a time of mixed emotions for many us. While it was a night of celebration, conjuring up memories of shows gone by and good friends made, the closing of Ad Hoc is also a big loss for the street art community & Bushwick itself. Not to be too jaded, but I doubt that the pro audio equipment store moving that is moving into the space will bring people together in quite the same way that the gallery did.

Luckily for those of us who still need to get our art fix on, many of the people who have been associated with Ad Hoc over the years have moved on to other exciting projects. Alex Emmart recently opened a new gallery space in D.U.M.B.O, Mighty Tanaka. Andrew Michael Ford is currently the director at Last Rites Gallery and is the owner of the fantastic online AMF Gallery. In December Ray Cross opened the Bushwick Print Lab, a new community silkscreen space in Bushwick/Ridgewood. And though Alison & Garrison Buxton may have closed down their Bogart Street gallery, they continue on with their curatorial endeavors as Ad Hoc, bringing Poland’s M-City to the streets of Queens and France’s Jef Aerosol to Eastern District(opening Friday, January 29th, running until Sunday, February 21st, 2010).

Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ad Hoc closing (photo by Becki Fuller)

Naked Ninjas! It’s Kid Acne & Ema

If you see an assassin on the streets of Willimasburg, never fear, it is likely just one of the many sexy & well-armed women that Kid Acne has been plastering the neighborhood with this past week. The British graffiti artist has been reunited with NYC’s Ema and her chubby, mustachioed men for some serious wheatpasting mayhem.

Skewville Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Skewville Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ema (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ema (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ema (photo by Becki Fuller)
Ema (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)
Kid Acne (photo by Becki Fuller)

New York M-City

I first came across the insanely detailed, large-scale, black & white, architectural stencil work of Polish artist M-City at Planet Prozess in Berlin in 2007.

M-City (photo by Luna Park)
M-City (photo by Luna Park)

Upon returning to Berlin a year later, I saw his work in the context of the Urban Affairs exhibition (with Dolk and Emess in the background).

M-City (photo by Luna Park)
M-City (photo by Luna Park)

Conveniently, he’d also done a wall in the Friedrichshain neighborhood down the street from where I was staying.

M-City (photo by Luna Park)
M-City (photo by Luna Park)

Yet the wall that has impressed me the most to date was this collaboration with Sten and Lex at La Forge in the Belleville section of Paris.

M-City (photo by Luna Park)
M-City (photo by Luna Park)

M-City painted his first mural in New York shortly before Christmas (at a wall curated by Ad Hoc).

M-City (photo by Luna Park)
M-City (photo by Luna Park)

Word has it he’ll be back in New York after New Years. Stay tuned for further M-City updates…

Studio Visit: Destroy & Rebuild

Descending the stairs into the Brooklyn basement that is home to the Destroy & Rebuild studio, your senses are immediately assaulted by loud beats and the pungent odor of paint fumes and smoke. Once you’ve acclimatized, you find yourself at the center of a hotbed of activity. The three-man collective that is Destroy & Rebuild is busy putting the final touches on an impressive, large canvas for the Red show at Manhattan’s Cheryl Hazan Gallery and the energy in the room is palpable. Anthony Vasquez washes screens and Mike Baca waves a dryer over a corner of the canvas, while Fernando Romero paces back and forth, spouting suggestions for improving the composition of the piece. I spent an afternoon in the studio with the guys and, contrary to my initial impression, came away firmly convinced that there is definitely a method to their madness.

Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)
Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)

In late 2005, Anthony founded Destroy & Rebuild after a stint in jail. His friend “By Hand” – now part of the 624713 Art Collective – introduced him to street vending and taught him the finer points of stenciling and silk-screening. Using his archive of graffiti and urban landscape photographs as a primary source, Anthony started working on creating his own screens. While he now has the capacity to burn screens in the studio, in the beginning he relied heavily on the Lower East Side community arts center ABC No Rio. By 2007, Mike had joined Destroy & Rebuild and between the two of them, they had enough material in production to start vending on their own. When Mike ran into some difficulties with the law, Fernando jumped in to help out … and the collective as it exists today was formed.

Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)
Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)

Spend enough time with Destroy & Rebuild and you’ll quickly realize they are a tight unit. Each canvas is created collaboratively, with each member taking turns adding and blending various elements. Fernando favors the paint brush and is responsible for laying down the colored or textured backdrops that form the foundation of a canvas. Mike contributes graphic elements and specializes in modes of transportation (think box trucks, taxicabs or police cruisers). Anthony concentrates mainly on architectural elements and newspaper collages; he’s also developed a rust patina to age and distress canvases.

Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)
Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)

When asked what motivates them, Fernando said it best: “It’s about the freshness of each new piece … the excitement of creating something new … and it’s a surprise every time.” Not a day goes past when they’re not painting, he said, and it shows in canvases that have become increasingly more refined. At their vending spot in SoHo, Destroy & Rebuild do a brisk business with their canvases. They sell to young and old, tourists and New Yorkers alike – “Even the Law loves us!” Mike chimes in, clearly amused that SoHo beat cops show an interest in their work.

Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)
Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)

The city of New York looms large as a defining influence on the work of these three native New Yorkers. Although they make use of some of New York’s many iconic images, that is but one element in their repertoire. Combined with their pride in New York’s graffiti heritage, with each canvas they capture a fleeting yet defining moment of New York at the end of a decade. While gentrification has run rampage in certain parts of New York, we all know that there are still plenty of raw spots to be found. This wild heart is the core of Destroy and Rebuild’s work and it’s powerful enough that it speaks to everyone.

Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)
Destroy & Rebuild (photo by Luna Park)

Anthony, Fernando and Mike have big plans for 2010 – watch out, Europe, here they come – and a strong enough work ethic to pull it off. You can find them at the corner of Prince and Greene Thursdays through Sundays or online at http://destroyandrebuildnyc.com/.

Many thanks to the lovely Julie for her hospitality!

Happy Holidays from the Street Spot! Stay tuned for more good things next year…

Pandemic / Kessler events

Whether you are looking for a gift for a loved one or just a little something special for yourself (you know how good you’ve been all year!), Pandemic Gallery is the place to go this evening. Deeker, Royce Bannon, Matt Siren, Keely, Abe Lincoln Jr., Overkill studios (Philly), and Dave Tree (Boston) will be waiting to turn your boring t-shirt, or whatever else you may have, into a work of art.

tshirtflyer

Not in the mood to shop? There will also be live painting with Morgan Thomas and Thomas Buildmore as well as a group wall for those of you who like to get in on the action.

With the festivities at Pandemic off to an early start, this will leave you plenty of time to swing by the Andy Kessler Memorial Art Show hosted by Volcom at their flagship store on Broadway.

NewKessler

Volcom NYC Presents:
Andy Kessler Memorial Foundation Benefit Art Show
Opening Night: Saturday, December 12th 8PM-Midnight

Young Sailor

Logan Hicks (photo by Luna Park)
Logan Hicks (photo by Luna Park)

This weekend, Logan Hicks painted a giant billboard of his young son in Brooklyn. I don’t often say this of murals, but this is just too cute!

Update: Our good friends at Brooklyn Street Art just posted a timelapse video of Logan in action:

Armer, Darkcloud, Goreb and Deeker "A Hounding Obsession" at Factory Fresh

Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)
Armer Darkcloud Gore B Deeker (photo by Becki Fuller)

A Hounding Obsession
Featuring the Artwork of Dark Cloud, Goreb, Armer & Deeker
November 13th thru November 29
Show Opens Friday, November 13th from 7-10pm

Factory Fresh
1053 Flushing Avenue

Morgan stop on L train
Brooklyn, NY 11237

Piece Out

Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)

The legends of graffiti descended upon the streets of SoHo this past Thursday, in celebration of the launch of Piecebook Reloaded: Rare Graffiti Drawings 1985-2005. Co-authors Sasha “SHR” Jenkins and David “Chino” Villorente were on hand to sign books, as were many of the artists featured in the book. Like the first Piecebook, Piecebook Reloaded mimics the actual sketchbooks graffiti artists have drawn in and passed around for years, right down to the marker bleed through between pages. Featured artists include Reas, Doc TC5, Veefer, Revolt, Pure, Abby, Ces, Part, Ket, Cope 2, and more.

Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)
Piecebook launch (photo by Becki Fuller)

Chino BYI and Sasha Jenkins : PIECE BOOK RELOADED from WHATYOUWRITE on Vimeo.

Specter

Specter continues to impress with his large-scale, hand-painted, one-of-a-kind paste-ups. His work is visually arresting and a welcome break from the increasingly superficial, “branded” street art that has become popular lately. His pieces go beyond being merely beautiful, they make a strong, political statement.

Of this latest series he writes on his website, “I often deal with socially marginalized people and places, an example of this is my ongoing project titled “If I Saw You in Heaven” where I address the issue of homelessness and our apathy towards it by introducing larger than life portraits of these individuals, making their image a celebration of humanity instead of a blight.

Specter (photo by Luna Park)
Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Specter (photo by Luna Park)
Specter (photo by Luna Park)

“Another project, “Discarded” also deals with these forgotten elements by highlighting the waste of our society. Large quantities of disposed food items left to rot characterize the excess that interplay with neglected properties, creating a story of the undervalued detritus of our culture.”

Specter (photo by Luna Park)
Specter (photo by Luna Park)

My Funny Browntine

browntine_flyer-714581
Come out to support Abe Lincoln Jr’s latest endeavor – tonight at Last Exit in Brooklyn!