Support A Savage Habbit

dulk

Visitors to Jersey City and surrounding Hudson County, NJ will have noticed that more than a dozen murals have sprung up in the last two years. These large-scale murals – produced by international visitors (Pixel Pancho, Case, Alice to name a few) as well as local favorites (LNY, Mataruda, Li Hill, Mr. Mustart, and more) – are the fruit of Savage Habbit’s labor. Having exhausted their own financial resources, Savage Habbit now turns to you, the art-appreciating public, to help support the production of the next cycle of murals. Please consider making a modest donation to their Savage Habbit Murals Project Kickstarter – it’s already 40% funded, so your contribution can make an enormous difference. It’s simple: all funds go directly towards purchasing paint and supplies to make more murals happen.

pixel pancho

li hill

case

lny mataruda

ekundayo

NO AD App Replaces Ads With Art

NOAD_Promo

I’m super excited to have contributed a few images to free NO AD app from Re+Public (PublicAdCampaign + The Heavy Projects) and the Subway Art Blog. BTW, that’s me and my honey testing the app last week. :) Using augmented reality technology, the app allows users to view curated digital art in place of ads within the NYC subway system. For the next month and a half, works by the following, illustrious group of artists will replace any of the 100 most widely circulating subway platform advertisements:

Adam Amengual – Amy Arbus – Beau Stanton – Caroline Caldwell – Dadi Dreucol – Dal East – Dan Bergeron – Daniel Jefferson – Dr. D – Elizabeth Winnel – Elle – El Tono – Faith 47 – Hugh Lippe – Ian Strange – Icy and Sot – Influenza – Jay Shells – Jeff Stark – Jilly Ballistic – John Fekner – Jon Burgerman – Jordan Seiler – Know Hope – Leon Reid IV – LNY – Logan Hicks – Luna Park – Mario Brotha – Michael Alan – Michael De Feo – Mobstr – Neko – Noxer – Nuria Mora – OX – Pedro Sega – Peter Fuss – Poster Boy – Remi Rough – Ron English – Rone – Saber – Sean Martindale – Sheryo – Skullphone – Stikman – Stormie Mills – Tara McPherson – Tod Seelie – Trap – Vermibus – WK Interact – Work Hard Be Nice

Much like the ads in the subway are constantly updated, the NO AD app will auto update with new content on a regular basis. So what are you waiting for? Next to one-upping PosterBoy and coming up with clever ad takeovers of your own, download the app and (at least virtually) zap those ads!

NYC Bus Shelter Ad Takeovers

Ad Takeover by Clint Mario & Me_NewYork (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Clint Mario & Me_NewYork (photo by Luna Park)

There’s one trend this summer I actually welcome wholeheartedly and that’s a steady uptick in the number of ad takeovers. (Hey, the New York Times is even sorta on it.)

Empowered by adbusting, artist activists such as Poster Boy and PublicAdCampaign (NO AD app coming soon), public space minded artists are keying into NYC bus shelters, newsstands and phone booths, replacing ads with art (and impunity).

This recent phonebooth takeover collaboration between Clint Mario and Me_NewYork includes a hilarious riff on a well-known Mens Wearhouse ad featuring former founder George Zimmer – they promise that we’re “gonna like the way Clint looks.”

Ad Takeover by Clint Mario & Me_NewYork (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Clint Mario & Me_NewYork (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Clint Mario & Me_NewYork  (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Clint Mario & Me_NewYork (photo by Luna Park)

Italian artist BR1 used a visit to NYC to introduce a series titled “Israeli Olives from Palestinian Trees”.

Ad Takeover by BR1 (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by BR1 (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by BR1 (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by BR1 (photo by Luna Park)

After a long absence, Specter returns to New York City’s streets, installing a series of abstracts, a project I hope he continues.

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Specter (photo by Luna Park)

Lister hit a couple bus shelters in Manhattan, but they were removed before I could catch them.

Ad Takeover by Lister (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Lister (photo by Luna Park)

The QRST and ELLE shelter pieces below both ran surprisingly long, despite QRST insisting “This is Temporary”.

Ad Takeover by QRST  (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by QRST (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by QRST (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by QRST (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by ELLE (photo by Luna Park)

PublicAdCampaign leads by example.

Ad Takeover by Public Ad Campaign (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Public Ad Campaign (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Public Ad Campaign (photo by Luna Park)

Ad Takeover by Public Ad Campaign (photo by Luna Park)

Bonus Bus Shelter Takeover by Adek BMT - no key necessary (photo by Luna Park)

Bonus Ad Takeover by Adek BTM – no key necessary! (photo by Luna Park)

WTF is street art anyway?

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy comes through with quite possibly my favorite ad takeover slash billboard liberation, asking a very pertinent and relevant question indeed.

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Poster Boy (photo by Luna Park)

Here’s video of the installation:

Tilden Re-Visited

Armer at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Armer at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Becki and I poked around Fort Tilden a week ago… although it’s not what it used to be, there’s still plenty of graffiti to be found.

You Go Girl et al at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

You Go Girl et al at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

You Go Girl at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

You Go Girl at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

UFO907 x Penelope at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

UFO907 x Penelope at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Sadue 907 at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Sadue907 at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Sulk x Sebo9 at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Sulk x Sebo9 at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Soulful at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Soulful at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Showta at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Showta at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Rambo at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Rambo at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

News x Serf at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

News x Serf at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Never at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Never at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Net at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Net at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Lush at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Lush at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Klops x Sefu at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Klops x Sefu at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Rusk x Katsu at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Rusk x Katsu at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Host18 at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Host18 at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Kuma at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Kuma at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Mint x Curve at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Mint x Curve at Tilden (photo by Luna Park)

Throwback Thursday: Tilden

bunker

While it’s wonderful that MoMA PS1 is bringing it’s art-star-laden Rockaway! exhibition to Fort Tilden this summer, I’d like to point out that Tilden was home to a much more organic, arts movement long before Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc on the Rockaways…

armer have fun and die

are you coulrophobic?

other

host18

sɐpn

navy8 bugle

taboo dym

runic beast

Reid & Seslow Launch Technophemera Project

Leon Reid IV & Ryan Seslow with their casts (photo by Luna Park)

Leon Reid IV & Ryan Seslow with their casts (photo by Luna Park)

I recently ran into artists Leon Reid IV and Ryan Seslow installing newly cast pieces from their collaborative project Technophemera at Welling Court. Curious to learn more, I asked them a few questions about the genesis of the project.

LP: How did this collaboration come about?

LR: The collaboration came about in an organic way. Ryan reached out to me around 2012 by inviting me to speak as a guest lecturer during his “History and Emergence of Street Art & Graffiti” course at LIU Post. From there we connected on alot of conceptual levels and decided to work collaboratively in some capacity. As with many collaborations, the concept for a work isn’t finalized in the beginning of the relationship, but rather over the course of many conversations and exchanges.

LP: What are you saying about art and technology with this installation?

LR: Previous to our meeting, Ryan had already begun casting old computer hardware in concrete – suggesting a fossilization process. After seeing these, I decided to bring my installation background to the table and came up with the idea that the hardware casts should be buried in an excavation site to create the illusion of ancient history.

The central theme behind the project is that technology is invented at such a rapid pace that devices even 5 years old may as well be treated as fossils.

Leon Reid IV & Ryan Seslow's technophemera casts (photo by Luna Park)

Leon Reid IV & Ryan Seslow’s technophemera casts (photo by Luna Park)

RS: I coined the term “technophemera” in late 2011 when I started placing casts in and around the NYC area. I leave them in public places free for people to take and/or become aware of their presence and displacement. The displacement is both obvious and also contextual. It questions they way we dispose of old technologies and hardware as well as our personal relationships to those devices and who we are becoming over time through this new consciousness. I still continue to leave various casts in and around and have also expanded to other objects like old aerosol cans – this gets a bit more specific, as it speaks directly to graffiti artists, how everything changes and evolves, with us or without us. We must choose who we are in relationship to those changes to maintain authenticity.

Leon Reid IV & Ryan Seslow's technophemera casts (photo by Luna Park)

Leon Reid IV & Ryan Seslow’s technophemera casts (photo by Luna Park)

Leon and Ryan are hoping to realize a collaborative installation of Technophemera on the LIU Post campus in connection with the Steinberg Museum of Art at Hillwood starting this fall. For more information, please visit http://www.leonthe4th.com/technophemera/1.html.

UPDATE: A Kickstarter has been launched to support the initiative as well: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/leonreid/technophemera.

Triple Play: Lister

Australian artist Anthony Lister’s been very busy in the weeks leading up to his solo show at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, opening tomorrow night. It’s been a while since we last featured him here, but I’m glad to report he’s showing his former hometown some love by completing a number of murals in Brooklyn and Manhattan. Here are three of the five seven he’s done so far:

lister

lister

lister

[Lister - all photos (c) Luna Park]

Lister is also the subject of the forthcoming Anthony Lister – Adventure Painter release from Gingko Press, authored by Roger Gastman and Tristan Manco.

Anthony Lister: Power Tripping
Jonathan LeVine Gallery
529 West 20th Street
9th Floor
New York, New York 10010

June 28—July 26, 2014
Opening: Saturday, June 28, 6—8pm

Serpent on the Banks of the Esopus

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Over the course of the last year, New York based artists Andrew H. Shirley and Amanda Wong built a tree-house in the boughs of a sugar maple tree on the banks of Ulster County’s Esopus Creek near Kingston, NY.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

The Esopus Creek (photo by Luna Park)

The tree-house was built entirely out of reclaimed materials sourced from nearby abandoned structures. The tree-house, reached by rickety ladder, is a sculptural space which will host three exhibitions this summer.

Amanda Wong explained the intent of the project: “Constructing the tree-house was a sculptural and curatorial project seeking to challenge the conventional places and aesthetics that form contemporary art practices by recontexualizing where and how art exists. The tree-house situates the exhibition of art within remote nature as a gesture towards geographically decentralizing and ideologically reconfiguring cultural centers such as museums and galleries.”

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

On Saturday, June 21st, the tree-house was inaugurated with a light installation by Andrew Poneros. Poneros’ illuminated, etched glass bottles were mounted individually on trees surrounding the tree-house.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

And within the tree-house, Poneros mounted a stunning chandelier, whose motifs of serpents, birds, fish and plants couldn’t have been better suited to the bucolic location. As the sun set, the tree-house slowly took on a warm and enchanting glow.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

At the base of the tree-house overlooking the creek, a small black & white TV played one of Poneros’ animations on loop. Be sure to take two minutes and watch Prey for the Eaten.

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Andrew Poneros in Andrew H. Shirley/Amanda Wong Treehouse (photo by Luna Park)

Michael Alan’s Living Installation

Living Installation (image courtesy Michael Alan)

Living Installation (image courtesy Michael Alan)

This Saturday, Greenpoint’s Succulent Studios welcomes Michael Alan’s Living Installation – in it’s 11th year! – on the occasion of the closing of the current PALABRA group show. “Alice in Wonderland XXX” is billed as an extraordinary 9-hour birthday extravaganza for Michael, featuring live models and a live musical soundscape by Michael and Tim Love Lee. Tickets ($20) are available here.

Saturday, June 21, 2014
4:00PM-1:00AM

Succulent Studios
67 West Street
5th Floor, Room 522
Brooklyn, NY 11222
Greenpoint Avenue G